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As the planet warms, unusual crops could become climate saviors - if we're willing to eat them 

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Resource Details

Resource ID

18266

Access

Open

Contributed by

B.Muralidhar

Topics

Crop improvement, Plant breeding (varieties & hybrids), Biotechnology: Transgenics/Genetic engineering, Climate change and Dryland stresses, Genetic Resources, Development Pathways, Pests and diseases, Nutrition

Crops

Grain legumes, Groundnut

Systems

Farming Systems

Locations

Asia, Eastern and Southern Africa, West and Central Africa

Global Date

08 Jan 20

Title

As the planet warms, unusual crops could become climate saviors - if we're willing to eat them

Keywords

Food Systems, Agriculture, Climate change, Climate resilient, Nutrition, Gene editing, Genetic engineering, Traditional breeding, Photosynthesis, Pests, CRISPR, Groundnut

Language

English

Size of PDF

465 kB

Author/Key contact

SMCO staff

Story Source

https://www.greenbiz.com/article/planet-warms-unusual-crops-could-become-climate-saviors-if-were-willing-eat-them

Publishing Location

Global

Type

Science

URL/Link

https://www.greenbiz.com/article/planet-warms-unusual-crops-could-become-climate-saviors-if-were-willing-eat-them

Description

In the future, plants’ ability to withstand extreme conditions will become critical. Scientists are working to increase hardiness in today’s staple crops like wheat and corn through gene editing, genetic engineering, and traditional breeding to increase the efficiency of photosynthesis, reduce water requirements and resist pests. In China, for example, researchers have used CRISPR to develop a strain of wheat that resists powdery mildew, a damaging fungal growth predicted to worsen with climate change. Meanwhile in India, the International Crops Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) developed early-maturing groundnuts to help farmers harvest before drought. Farmers who adopted these varietals earned an additional US$119 per hectare (2.5 acres), according to the organization.

New ICRISAT Research Programs

West & Central Africa program, Eastern & Southern Africa Program, Genetic Gains Program, Innovation systems for the Drylands

Date (Date published/released/created if known)

08 Jan 20

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